Category Archives: Mold

Everything you need to know about mold: the causes, the risks, and what you can do about it.

If you encounter a mold infestation, call us for your residential mold remediation or commercial mold restoration needs immediately. Certain types of mold can be a serious health risk and require immediate attention.

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Kill Mold on Drywall, Wood, Carpet and Tiles

Mold on Drywall

If you find mold growing on unpainted drywall in your home you will have to remove the drywall and replace it. Unfortunately there is no way to completely remove mold from unpainted drywall since it is a porous material.

How to Remove Moldy Drywall

Use a utility knife to cut out any section of drywall with mold on it. You should make sure to cut out an area that covers at least two of the wooden beams behind the drywall. This is so you’ll be able to properly attach the replacement section of drywall onto the two beams.

Next you’ll need to cut out a section of new drywall to replace the drywall you just removed. Use a tape measure to measure out the length and width of the new section of drywall that you’ll need so that it will fit properly. Then use the utility knife to cut out the section of new drywall.

Make sure that the new drywall fits snugly in place and then use drywall screws to attach it to the wooden beams. After this you should apply joint compound (also called drywall compound or mud) and then leave it to dry. Once you’ve left it for 24 hours you can then sand the joint compound down to smooth it out. You can also then paint the drywall if you like.

It’s a good idea to HEPA vacuum the room as well to remove any mold stirred up during the process.

Mold on Painted Drywall

If you find mold on drywall that is painted or primed then the good news is you shouldn’t have to remove the drywall. This is because the mold should be just on the surface and shouldn’t have penetrated into the drywall itself.

Wipe or scrub the mold away using a cleaning product or mold killing solution. You can find some mold killing solutions and directions on how to use them at the Killing Mold page.


 

Mold on Wood

It’s usually safe to keep using moldy wood once you’ve cleaned it up. Although there might be some small amount of mold left below the surface of the wood, it shouldn’t regrow and cause problems provided you keep the moisture in your home to a minimum. If the wood is painted then it’s even better news since the mold probably wouldn’t have penetrated into the surface of the wood.

How to Remove Mold from Wood

To clean moldy wood wipe or scrub the mold from the surface using a sponge, cloth or scrubbing brush, along with some water and detergent, or any other household cleaner. See the Killing Mold page for some effective solutions to remove mold.

You can use a mold killer if you want, such as bleach, although it isn’t necessary as the main goal is just to remove mold from the surface. There are always going to be small amounts of mold and spores in your home anyway, so trying to kill all the mold spores isn’t the aim. Plus dead mold spores are still allergenic.

The same general process for removing mold from wood applies whether the mold is on wooden furniture, wooden walls, wooden beams or any other wood.

Removing Mold Stains from Wood

Once you’ve cleaned mold growth off wood there might still be a mold stain left behind. Don’t worry, this is just a cosmetic problem and the mold shouldn’t regrow as long as your house doesn’t have any big moisture problems. And if you do get moisture problems then mold will grow in your home whether or not there’s a mold stain left behind anyway.

If you don’t like the look of the stain you can sand the wood if you want. This should usually remove the stain, although sometimes the mold stain might run deep into the wood so that it can’t be completely sanded away.

Another way to get rid of left over mold stains is to use a small amount of bleach to fade it away. This could discolor the wood though so it’s a good idea to do a spot test.

Removing Moldy Wood

Another option of course is to remove and replace wood with mold on it. Usually this is not worth the cost and trouble compared to cleaning, but if it’s a situation where the wood is cheap and easy to replace you might decide it’s the best option.

After Remediating Mold on Wood

You’ll need to HEPA vacuum the surrounding area once you’ve removed the mold from the wood. During mold removal it’s inevitable that some mold spores are stirred up and so you need to remove as many as possible by HEPA vacuuming.

After you’ve finished cleaning up the mold problem you might want to coat the wood with a fungicidal sealant or paint so that you know it’s completely safe. This way any mold left in the wood certainly won’t affect you and no new mold should begin to grow on the wood either.


 

Mold on Carpet

If you can see significant mold growth on wall to wall carpeting in your home then you need to get rid of the carpet. Unfortunately there’s no way to completely remove mold from fixed carpeting. And ignoring mold on the carpet will only lead to the problem getting worse.

Wet Carpet

The same goes for carpet that has been soaked right through. Once the padding on the bottom of carpeting gets wet it takes a very long time to dry out, much longer than the 24-48 hours mold needs to grow. Even though the top layer of carpet might seem to dry out fairly quickly, the layer of padding underneath stays wet long after.

Replacing Part of Carpet

If only a small section of your carpet got wet or has mold on it then you can cut out and remove just the affected part of the carpet. When you’re cutting out the carpet make sure to cut an extra 12 inches on each side further than the moldy or wet part. You can then replace it with a new section of carpet, as long as you don’t mind the slight cosmetic difference of having a section which might not perfectly match the rest.

Make sure to let the floor dry out properly if it’s still wet before you insert the new piece of carpet. It’s also a good idea to HEPA vacuum too, once the floor is dry, before you install the new section of carpet.

Removing Mold on Rugs and Non-Fixed Carpet

Rugs or carpets that aren’t wall to wall, permanently-fixed carpeting can be cleaned to remove mold. The best thing is to talk to a professional carpet cleaning service or mold removal professional. Make sure they know how to remove mold from carpets or rugs and they have had experience at it. You should be able to remove the carpet and send it to them to professionally clean and dry it to remove the mold.

If you want to try to clean the mold yourself from your rug or non-fixed carpet you should first take it outside. Then spread it out, for example on the driveway, and hose both sides.

Next use a mold killing or cleaning solution on the moldy area of the carpet and scrub the mold away. Some of the most effective mold killers and cleaners can be found at Killing Mold. After you have finished you should rinse the carpet well.

Use a wet vacuum on the carpet, if you have one, to help dry it out faster once you’ve rinsed it. Then let the carpet dry in the sun, making sure both sides get completely dried. Only take the carpet back into your home if it is perfectly dry all the way through.

Once the carpet’s dry HEPA vacuum it to remove any mold spores that might be left in it. Beating the carpet on the line when it’s dry also helps to remove mold spores and other dirt and dust from it.


 

Mold on Tiles and Grout

You’ll often see mold growing on tiles in places like the bathroom. The good news is that mold can easily be cleaned from the non-porous surfaces of tiles.

How to Remove Mold from Tiles and Grout

Begin by scrubbing the mold off of the tiles and grout. You should use a scrubbing brush along with a household cleaning product or mold killing product. There are also commercial tile or grout cleaners you can buy.

After this you’ll probably find there is still mold stains left on the grout. You can use bleach to fade these stains away. Before you use the bleach you should spot test it to make sure that it won’t discolor your tiles. You should also wear gloves to protect your hands from the bleach.

Apply the bleach to the grout and leave it sit for about 10 minutes. Instead of chlorine bleach you can use hydrogen peroxide if you like, or buy a product like Oxiclean which contains oxygen bleach. If you have a septic system it’s better to use oxygen bleach than chlorine bleach.

Another alternative is to use baking soda. Mix it with water to create a paste and then use a toothbrush to scrub it onto the grout.

If you find the stain remains on the grout after bleaching then repeat the process. Afterwards rinse the bleach off thoroughly with water.

If the stains won’t go away you can try using paper towels soaked in bleach. Saturate paper towels in bleach and then stick them to the grout where there are stains. Give it some time and this should fade away the mold stains on the grout.

Grout Sealer

Another thing you can do is apply grout sealer to the grout. This will protect you from any small amount of mold left on the grout and also help to prevent mold growing in the future.

Replacing Grout

You also have the option of replacing the grout all together. First you’ll need to scrape out the old grout. You can use a flat head screwdriver for this. You can buy new grout mixture from the hardware store and apply it yourself. Sealing the new grout with grout sealer afterwards will give you even more mold protection.

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Five Steps To Proper Mold Remediation

Mold has had its 15 minutes of fame over the last few years. Though the hype has died down, mold is still an important issue. Customer complaints require home builders to have a fast action plan; both to clean up the mold problem and to show customers a quality home builder is looking out for their health and safety and the durability of their home.

There are two important things to remember about mold: prevent it by doing things right the first time and when you do face mold, take care of it immediately. Ensuring that your warranty team follows a process for mold remediation will take care of the latter.

The following steps, which can be adapted to fit within your company’s policy, serve as a basic process for quickly remediating mold problems.

Step 1: Learn about moisture

Assessing mold growth involves more than just looking at what’s visibly growing on the walls or in a corner. Mold can be an invisible intruder, growing behind and around what you first see. Such devious behavior requires inquisitive thinking. First, understand that behind all mold growth is a water or moisture problem. Second, become a master of moisture — know where moisture comes from and how it gets into the home. The ultimate goal of these two steps is for warranty representatives to identify a moisture source and use its location to help locate all mold growth, not just what’s immediately visible.

Step 2: Document the mold problem and create a remediation plan

Before you begin remediation, document the mold situation with writing, photos and video. The warranty team supervisor will use the documentation to develop a remediation plan, which typically answers questions like when work is slated to begin, when that work is scheduled to be completed, who will be performing the remediation, any testing that should be done, and if homeowners will be temporarily relocated. In the longer term, the documentation can help manage liability for your company or point to larger trends in mold growth.

Step 3: Calculate the extent of the contamination

Mold may not always grow in one area, so you need to figure out how much contamination you’re really looking at. Calculating the extent of the contamination will impact how you approach mold removal and clean up. The goal of mold remediation is to clean up mold growing within the home, and to avoid exposing homeowners to large amounts of mold. The New York City Department of Health (NYC DOH) has developed guidelines for cleaning up mold contamination. These guidelines are widely used in the construction industry and recommend six levels of mold remediation based on the square footage of the mold and whether or not the mold is located within the home’s HVAC system.

Step 4: Remediate mold contamination

Remediation will always involve cleaning up existing mold while avoiding exposure to oneself as well as homeowners, as well as preventing new growth by addressing the moisture source. Based on your calculation of the contamination area, determine if you’re working in an area up to 30 square feet (approximately the size of a full sheet of drywall). If so, you’ll be following the guidelines for remediation levels 1 and 2. Level 1 remediation is used for small, isolated areas of mold up to 10 square feet and Level 2 remediation covers square footage from 10 to 30 square feet.

The clean up process is the same for Level 1 and Level 2 mold remediation and comprises these steps:

  • Repair the water problem. This will help prevent new mold spores from growing.
  • Isolate the contaminated area. Close all doors and windows between the contaminated area and other rooms of the home for both levels. For Level 2 remediation, also cover all doorways and any other openings with 6 mil polyethylene sheeting. Seal all seams of the sheeting with duct tape and slip openings in the sheeting to enter the contaminated area.
  • Suppress dust. Do this by misting the contaminated areas.
  • Remove materials. Remove all wet and mold-damaged porous materials. Check with your supervisor and reference the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document, Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings,  if you’re not sure which materials to remove.
  • Place materials in plastic bags. Discard all wet and moldy materials in plastic bags that are at least 6 mil thick, double-bag the materials, and tie the bags closed. The bags can be disposed of as regular trash once the outside of the bags are wiped with a damp cloth and detergent solution prior to leaving the contamination area.
  • Clean. All non-porous materials and wood surfaces that are moldy must be cleaned. Use a wire brush on all moldy surfaces and then wipe the area with disposable wipes. To dispose of as regular trash, discard wipes in 6 mil polyethylene bags, double-bag and tie closed. Finally, scrub all moldy surfaces using a damp cloth and detergent solution until all mold has been removed and rinsed cleaned surfaces with clean water.
  • Clean the affected area and egress. The process for Level 1 differs from Level 2 at this point. For Level 1, clean with a damp cloth and/or mop with detergent solution. Level 2 requires you to vacuum all surfaces with a HEPA vacuum, and then clean all surfaces with a damp cloth and/or mop and detergent solution. Discard wipes as described above.
  • Visibility test. All areas should be visibly free of contamination and debris — no dust and dirt means no mold.
  • Dry. Cleaned materials should be dried to allow leftover moisture to evaporate. To speed up the drying process, use fans, dehumidifiers or raise the indoor air temperature.
  • Replace. All materials that were moved should be replaced or repaired.

Reference the remediation plan during the actual remediation to make sure it’s being followed. If additional mold is discovered during the clean up, the warranty supervisor should update the plan.

For contamination areas greater than 30 square feet, many builders hire outside mold remediation firms to perform the clean up. In this case, you and your team switch from actually performing mold remediation to supervising a qualified contractor. Having a general understanding of the proper procedures an outside company should be following is useful. The NYC DOH guidelines address such procedures for Level 3 contamination and above.

Step 5: Determine if clean up has been successful

Just because the mold is gone and there’s no dirt or dust doesn’t mean that you’re done. Your last step is to determine if your clean-up efforts have been successful. While this last step is a judgment call, there are some options and guidelines to follow.

The EPA document, Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings, is a great resource that provides guidelines for helping you complete your clean up efforts. Some of these guidelines include:

  • The moisture problem has been fixed. Verify this by revisiting the home soon after remediation — you shouldn’t see any signs of recurring water damage.
  • No sign of visible mold, mold-damaged materials or moldy odors.
  • Homeowners should be able to occupy or re-occupy the home without physical symptoms or aggravated health complaints.

Depending on your company and the specific details of a mold problem, additional testing by an environmental testing company may be performed after the clean up to verify that all mold has been removed.

When it comes to mold, the key is to implement a comprehensive moisture management strategy. Potential liability and health issues from mold can be dramatically decreased by doing it right the first time. Clean up must be immediate and thorough, following a process like the above steps. It may sound over-simplified, but the primary failure in response to homeowner complaints is simply the fact that builders don’t respond fast enough, or with the emphasis that the issue is potentially serious.

Minimum personal protection equipment for levels 1 and 2 remediation includes an N95 respirator, eye goggles without vents and rubber gloves that extend to mid-forearm.

Got Mold?

Following an immediate and thorough remediation plan is essential for getting rid of the mold and showing your customers you’re committed to acting quickly.

Before entering a home to assess a mold growth situation, make sure you have the necessary personal protective equipment.

mold-hero

Five Steps To Proper Mold Remediation

Mold has had its 15 minutes of fame over the last few years. Though the hype has died down, mold is still an important issue. Customer complaints require home builders to have a fast action plan; both to clean up the mold problem and to show customers a quality home builder is looking out for their health and safety and the durability of their home.

There are two important things to remember about mold: prevent it by doing things right the first time and when you do face mold, take care of it immediately. Ensuring that your warranty team follows a process for mold remediation will take care of the latter.

The following steps, which can be adapted to fit within your company’s policy, serve as a basic process for quickly remediating mold problems.

Step 1: Learn about moisture

Assessing mold growth involves more than just looking at what’s visibly growing on the walls or in a corner. Mold can be an invisible intruder, growing behind and around what you first see. Such devious behavior requires inquisitive thinking. First, understand that behind all mold growth is a water or moisture problem. Second, become a master of moisture — know where moisture comes from and how it gets into the home. The ultimate goal of these two steps is for warranty representatives to identify a moisture source and use its location to help locate all mold growth, not just what’s immediately visible.

Step 2: Document the mold problem and create a remediation plan

Before you begin remediation, document the mold situation with writing, photos and video. The warranty team supervisor will use the documentation to develop a remediation plan, which typically answers questions like when work is slated to begin, when that work is scheduled to be completed, who will be performing the remediation, any testing that should be done, and if homeowners will be temporarily relocated. In the longer term, the documentation can help manage liability for your company or point to larger trends in mold growth.

Step 3: Calculate the extent of the contamination

Mold may not always grow in one area, so you need to figure out how much contamination you’re really looking at. Calculating the extent of the contamination will impact how you approach mold removal and clean up. The goal of mold remediation is to clean up mold growing within the home, and to avoid exposing homeowners to large amounts of mold. The New York City Department of Health (NYC DOH) has developed guidelines for cleaning up mold contamination. These guidelines are widely used in the construction industry and recommend six levels of mold remediation based on the square footage of the mold and whether or not the mold is located within the home’s HVAC system. Following the NYC DOH’s guidelines, available online athttp://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/epi/moldrpt1.shtml, calculate the remediation level needed.

Step 4: Remediate mold contamination

Remediation will always involve cleaning up existing mold while avoiding exposure to oneself as well as homeowners, as well as preventing new growth by addressing the moisture source. Based on your calculation of the contamination area, determine if you’re working in an area up to 30 square feet (approximately the size of a full sheet of drywall). If so, you’ll be following the guidelines for remediation levels 1 and 2. Level 1 remediation is used for small, isolated areas of mold up to 10 square feet and Level 2 remediation covers square footage from 10 to 30 square feet.

The clean up process is the same for Level 1 and Level 2 mold remediation and comprises these steps:

  • Repair the water problem. This will help prevent new mold spores from growing.
  • Isolate the contaminated area. Close all doors and windows between the contaminated area and other rooms of the home for both levels. For Level 2 remediation, also cover all doorways and any other openings with 6 mil polyethylene sheeting. Seal all seams of the sheeting with duct tape and slip openings in the sheeting to enter the contaminated area.
  • Suppress dust. Do this by misting the contaminated areas.
  • Remove materials. Remove all wet and mold-damaged porous materials. Check with your supervisor and reference the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document, Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings, (http://www.epa.gov/mold/mold_remediation.html) if you’re not sure which materials to remove.
  • Place materials in plastic bags. Discard all wet and moldy materials in plastic bags that are at least 6 mil thick, double-bag the materials, and tie the bags closed. The bags can be disposed of as regular trash once the outside of the bags are wiped with a damp cloth and detergent solution prior to leaving the contamination area.
  • Clean. All non-porous materials and wood surfaces that are moldy must be cleaned. Use a wire brush on all moldy surfaces and then wipe the area with disposable wipes. To dispose of as regular trash, discard wipes in 6 mil polyethylene bags, double-bag and tie closed. Finally, scrub all moldy surfaces using a damp cloth and detergent solution until all mold has been removed and rinsed cleaned surfaces with clean water.
  • Clean the affected area and egress. The process for Level 1 differs from Level 2 at this point. For Level 1, clean with a damp cloth and/or mop with detergent solution. Level 2 requires you to vacuum all surfaces with a HEPA vacuum, and then clean all surfaces with a damp cloth and/or mop and detergent solution. Discard wipes as described above.
  • Visibility test. All areas should be visibly free of contamination and debris — no dust and dirt means no mold.
  • Dry. Cleaned materials should be dried to allow leftover moisture to evaporate. To speed up the drying process, use fans, dehumidifiers or raise the indoor air temperature.
  • Replace. All materials that were moved should be replaced or repaired.

Reference the remediation plan during the actual remediation to make sure it’s being followed. If additional mold is discovered during the clean up, the warranty supervisor should update the plan.

For contamination areas greater than 30 square feet, many builders hire outside mold remediation firms to perform the clean up. In this case, you and your team switch from actually performing mold remediation to supervising a qualified contractor. Having a general understanding of the proper procedures an outside company should be following is useful. The NYC DOH guidelines address such procedures for Level 3 contamination and above.

Step 5: Determine if clean up has been successful

Just because the mold is gone and there’s no dirt or dust doesn’t mean that you’re done. Your last step is to determine if your clean-up efforts have been successful. While this last step is a judgment call, there are some options and guidelines to follow.

The EPA document, Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings, is a great resource that provides guidelines for helping you complete your clean up efforts. Some of these guidelines include:

  • The moisture problem has been fixed. Verify this by revisiting the home soon after remediation — you shouldn’t see any signs of recurring water damage.
  • No sign of visible mold, mold-damaged materials or moldy odors.
  • Homeowners should be able to occupy or re-occupy the home without physical symptoms or aggravated health complaints.

Depending on your company and the specific details of a mold problem, additional testing by an environmental testing company may be performed after the clean up to verify that all mold has been removed.

When it comes to mold, the key is to implement a comprehensive moisture management strategy. Potential liability and health issues from mold can be dramatically decreased by doing it right the first time. Clean up must be immediate and thorough, following a process like the above steps. It may sound over-simplified, but the primary failure in response to homeowner complaints is simply the fact that builders don’t respond fast enough, or with the emphasis that the issue is potentially serious.

Minimum personal protection equipment for levels 1 and 2 remediation includes an N95 respirator, eye goggles without vents and rubber gloves that extend to mid-forearm.

Got Mold?

Following an immediate and thorough remediation plan is essential for getting rid of the mold and showing your customers you’re committed to acting quickly.

Before entering a home to assess a mold growth situation, make sure you have the necessary personal protective equipment.

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How to Remove Mold After Water Damage

After the clean-up is complete from water damage in your home, you will most likely have some mold issues to deal with. It can take some time for the mold to become visible. You must remove the mold as soon as possible to stop its growth. With a few supplies and a little work, you can remove the mold without the help of a professional, so long as you treat it immediately.

Step 1 – Extract All Moisture

Mold grows in damp areas. You must remove all moisture to stop the growth. Keep air flowing by running fans and opening windows. Turn on a dehumidifier to extract the moisture faster. Be sure to check the holding tank, because it will fill with water and need to be emptied. This water will also contain mold spores. You will not want to leave it sitting for long. After you have a handle on the moisture, you can start cleaning the mold.

Step 2 – Cleaning the Big Surfaces

The walls and floors will need to be cleaned first. Pull up the carpet and take it outside in the sun. The sun kills mold. Leave it out until you have finished cleaning inside. Next, mix 1-cup of chlorine bleach with a bucket of warm water. Put on your ventilator mask and rubber gloves. Wipe down the walls with a rag and let them dry. Mop the floor with this same solution. After the walls and floors have dried, go over them again with warm water and liquid disinfectant. Follow the disinfectant label instructions for the amount, as it varies by product. You may have to repeat this every 2 to 3 days until the mold has disappeared. You’ll then work on the wood surfaces.

Step 3 – Cleaning Wood Furniture

To remove mold spores from wood surfaces, such as desks, tables, and book cases, use a rag and denatured alcohol. Pour a little of the denatured alcohol on the rag and rub down the wood surfaces. The denatured alcohol should not harm your finish, but you should check to be sure by testing in an inconspicuous area before wiping the whole surface. Allow the alcohol to dry completely then spray with disinfectant. After all of your wood surfaces are cleaned, you can treat your porous surfaces.

Step 3 – Porous Surface Cleaning

Porous surfaces, such as upholstered or fabric items, will collect mold spores. Take any washable fabric items and wash them in the hottest possible temperature which the fabric will allow. Take upholstered items outside. Working on the fabric will cause the mold spores to go into the air. Brush the fabric with a soft brush. Leave the items in the sun all day to kill mold. Spray them with disinfectant and return your items back inside the house. Use your vacuum to extract the dead mold spores from the upholstery. The mold should be eliminated now. If you notice that it is not all gone, you will need to repeat this process.

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Mold Remediation and Restoration

Mold-Removal-Remediation-Kahului-Maui-1Any home or business can quickly become infested with mold with the introduction of a water source, like a roof or plumbing leak. Mold can spread throughout a property in as little as 48-72 hours, and can produce allergens and irritants that have the potential to cause other health effects.

If you suspect that your home or business has a mold problem, TSC Restoration can inspect and assess your property. If mold is found, they have the training, equipment, and expertise to handle the situation.

Please refer to our Mold Damage Tips to learn more about mold and what to do until help arrives.

TSC Restoration

  • Provide 24/7 Emergency Service
  • Highly Trained Water Restoration Specialists
  • Faster to Any Size Disaster
  • A Trusted Leader in the Restoration Industry with over 1,700 Franchises

If You See Signs of Mold, Call 1 (619) 596-3888

Understanding Mold

Microscopic mold spores exist almost everywhere, outdoors and indoors, making it impossible to remove all mold from a home or business. Some restoration businesses advertise “mold removal” and even guarantee to remove all mold, which is a fallacy. Consider the following mold facts:

  • Mold is present almost everywhere, indoors and outdoors.
  • Mold spores are microscopic and float along in the air, and may enter your home through windows, doors, or AC/heating systems or even hitch a ride indoors on your clothing or on a pet.
  • Mold spores thrive on moisture. Mold spores can quickly grow into colonies when exposed to water.
  • Before mold remediation can begin, any sources of water or moisture must be addressed. Otherwise, the mold may return.
  • Mold often produces a strong, musty odor and can lead you to possible mold problem areas.
  • Even higher-than-normal indoor humidity can support mold growth. Keep indoor humidity below 45 percent.

Common Mold Misconceptions

With sensational news stories and misleading advertising, you can easily understand why so many people are misinformed about indoor mold. Learn the facts about mold and the mold remediation process.

  • What is “Black Mold”
  • “Mold Removal” versus Mold Remediation

Why Choose  TSC Restoration?

fast response to mold damage

They’re Faster to Any Size Disaster

TSC Restoration  are dedicated to responding immediately when you contact them. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces cost.

 

highly trained mold remediation technicians

They’re Highly Trained Mold Remediation Specialists

They specialize in water and mold damage restoration, the cornerstone of our business. TSC Restoration have the training and expertise to safely handle any mold situation.

  • Applied Microbial Remediation Specialist
  • Water Damage Restoration Technician
  • Applied Structural Drying Technician

 

fast mold damage cleanup

They Use Advanced Mold Remediation Techniques and Equipment

TSC Restoration use advanced equipment to detect the source of water feeding the mold. Next, they isolate the affected area using a negative air pressure chamber.

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WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION & REPAIR

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Destructive Power of Water

Water is the single most long-term destructive substance in the indoor environment. Excess moisture or flooding can cause structures and personal property to rapidly deteriorate. The problem becomes more serious when the water is unsanitary or clean-up services are delayed.

The harmful effects of water are sharply reduced by prompt and effective intervention, especially within the first 24-48 hours. Even though the damage may look severe, cleanup and restoration can produce amazing results. From furniture to family heirlooms, office computers to production machinery.

Where Water Damage Occurs

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Water Damage Cleanup and Repair

The restoration process is very scientific. To determine if your property can be restored or must be replaced, we evaluate three criteria:

  • Amount of Property Damage
  • Degree of Contamination
  • Replacement Costs vs. Restoration Costs

If not promptly and properly dealt with, water damage can cause major business interruption, financial burdens and potential health risks.

mold-culture

Mold – Stop It Before It Starts

The window of opportunity to prevent mold growth is measured in hours, not days or weeks.  To prevent mold from developing, you need a fast response from a professional water damage restoration contractor . Although really dangerous molds are not an everyday occurrence, any mold has the potential to cause health problems and proper removal is critical.

From initial air quality testing and mold identification to safe removal methods, we make sure your property is repaired quickly and professionally.

Mold in the corner of the white ceiling and yellow wall, with white heat pipe.

Why You Need To Hire a Mold Removal Professional

Mold is not something to mess around with. Lurking in dark spaces, destroying your hard-earned property—it’s a serious problem. Mold  will often go undetected and unseen. This fungal destroyer can be found in bathrooms, underneath tile, in laundry rooms, and even kitchens. Whether you smell it, spot it, or just reckon it’s there, here’s why you need to hire a mold removal professional.

    • Mold spreads fast. Even a little bit of mold is bad news. If the are is wet and dark, the mold will flourish.  Once this happens, it’s only a matter of time before the well-being of your home deteriorates. The earlier you call, the easier the restoration is.

  • Mold makes allergy symptoms even worse. If you have itchy eyes, a runny nose, a sore throat, and fatigue, you may think that your seasonal allergies are back. In some cases, though, it could be mold. Once mold is growing, it spreads quickly. The tiny spores can easily be blown around your home, exacerbating your allergies. Calling a mold professional is the easiest way to restore your health and get rid of the problem.
  • Mold is a huge health risk and can lead to many serious conditions.  When inhaled, the spores create respiratory infections and other ailments. If the mold isn’t completely eliminated, these health risks grow exponentially. Hire a professional company to secure your family’s health.
  • You may not have the professional equipment. Mold is difficult to kill completely. Companies have the equipment needed to eliminate mold from walls, wood, closets, clothes and any other place it may be hiding. With their professional tools, there isn’t a risk of damaging your belongings.
  • Professional companies know how to detect all molds. Don’t try to DIY when it comes to mold removal. Professional removal services can detect all visible, dormant, and hidden molds. Then, using proven techniques, they kill the mold, preventing regrowth.
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Mold In YOUR WORKPLACE or Home Has Serious Health Results But COULD BE Eliminated

Mold In YOUR WORKPLACE or Home Has Serious Health Results But COULD BE Eliminated

If you have obvious mold in your office or home, you have a significant problem. Nevertheless, you can ask professionals who may take action to resolve the condition and better your indoor quality of air for weeks and even a long time.

Actually, most air has some mildew spores in it. Those spores everywhere seem to be to be. However when they’re around in large quantities, they could be bad for humans and pets, triggering respiratory problems, allergies and more.

Symptoms of mildew vulnerability start mild and worsen, oftentimes. They include:

– sinus problems such as a runny nostril as well as sinus congestion
– soreness of the eye, including redness and itchiness
– difficulty in breathing like wheezing or torso tightness
– coughing
– burning, tingling or scratching of the neck
– rashes or other varieties of discomfort of your skin
– pain in the top
– uncontrollable sneezing
– asthma
– and more.

Mildew can be dangerous for newborns especially, the elderly and folks who’ve existing disease fighting capability problems. Generally, the symptoms of mildew exposure may differ from individual to individual and can expand rapidly worse. People who have center and lung problems may be vunerable to mold-related health issues even though others subjected to the same environment don’t develop problems.

Fortunately, mildew remediation can be done to completely clean up mildew infestation and improve inside air quality. This technique starts off with removal of the foundation of the water that is allowing the mildew to increase. Then, reduction of future mildew growth is performed. Finally, existing mildew must be cleansed up. You will discover mildew remediators that give attention to all areas of mildew cleanup, including textile restoration and recovery of the building’s framework.

Mildew remediation is an activity that can release more mildew in to the oxygen if done improperly, so it is practical to leave this technique to professionals. The chemicals that cause man reactions to mildew are present following the mildew has passed on even, so cleaning it away is vital.

Mold remediation often will involve the next things:

– analysis to see what must be done and exactly how cleanup can be achieved safely
– HVAC cleaning to eliminate mildew from ducts as well as warming and air equipment
– use of protecting clothing, including respirators, to safeguard workers
– dry out cleaning or agitation to get mildew off porous areas
– dry-ice blasting to remove mold on cement and wood
– wet vacuuming
– damp wiping
– HEPA-filtered vacuuming
– and more.

10 Most Common Places for Mold Growth in Your Home

Mold maybe one of the funniest Halloween costumes we’ve seen lately, but it is no joke when it comes to your home or business. Mold can be dangerous and if you find it growing in your home it is something that needs to be removed immediately.

How is the air quality in your home?

Mold is a living organism that belongs to the fungi family (like mushrooms, yeast, and even some  cheeses like blue cheese). Continue reading